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Is monotasking the new multitasking?




Research coming out of UC Irvine shows that humans have finite neural resources that are depleted every time they switch between tasks.
Research coming out of UC Irvine shows that humans have finite neural resources that are depleted every time they switch between tasks.
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

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Multitasking in the workplace is typically lauded as an ideal capability for workers. But, how much work do the multitaskers get done?

Is there a lack of focus, making people more susceptible to making errors? Is there value in concentrating on one task at a time?  In today’s fast-paced, multi-gadget, omni-connected social world, maybe there is.

Research coming out of UC Irvine shows that humans have finite neural resources that are depleted every time they switch between tasks. This can lead to distraction and sluggish progress.

How comfortable are you making the choice to zero in on one project at a time? How much time can you let pass before you check your email or twitter feed? Can you ignore a text?

Guest:

Gloria Mark, Professor of Informatics at UC Irvine