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How sudden weight loss can devastate your metabolism




Casting director Marc Levine explains the process to the crowd of well over 500 people waiting during an open audition to be on the popular TV show,
Casting director Marc Levine explains the process to the crowd of well over 500 people waiting during an open audition to be on the popular TV show, "The Biggest Loser", season #10.
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

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Reality television shows like "The Biggest Loser" can be motivational in kick-starting our own weight loss, but are diet and extreme exercise the most effective way to lose weight and keep it off?

A new study published Monday in Obesity, a research journal, followed 14 former participants of "The Biggest Loser" for six years and found that most had regained the weight they lost, perhaps because their metabolic rate had significantly slowed down. 

A person's resting metabolic rate determines how many calories they burn while at rest and greatly influences our ability to maintain a certain weight.

The study raises questions not just about the effectiveness of "The Biggest Loser" and similar weight loss shows but about the methods of the entire weight loss industry. How effective are low-carb, gluten-free, paleo and vegan diets? How much does biology matter when trying to lose weight? What are some of your best and worst weight-loss experiences?

Guest:

Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, M.D., Medical Director, Bariatric Medical Institute in Ottawa; Author, “The Diet Fix” (March 2014); Board-Certified Physician by the American Board of Bariatric (Obesity) Medicine; he blogs at weightymatters.ca