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North Carolina sues federal government over ‘bathroom’ law




The so-called
The so-called "bathroom battle" erupted after North Carolina in March became the first US state to require transgender people to use restrooms in public buildings that match the sex on their birth certificate, rather than the gender by which they identify.
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

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(AP) North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory's administration sued the federal government Monday in a fight for a state law that limits protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

The lawsuit seeks to keep in place the law, which the U.S. Justice Department said last week violated the civil rights of transgender people against sex discrimination on the job and in education.

The Justice Department had set a Monday deadline for McCrory to report whether he would refuse to enforce the law that took effect in March. McCrory's defiance could risk funding for the state's university system and lead to a protracted legal battle.

Federal civil rights enforcement attorneys focused in their warning letters particularly on provisions requiring transgender people to use public restrooms that correspond to their biological sex. The letters threatening possible federal lawsuits were sent to McCrory, leaders of the 17-campus University of North Carolina system, and the state's public safety agency.

Guests:

Matthew McReynolds,  senior staff attorney at Pacific Justice Institute in Sacramento, which works to defend religious liberties and parental rights

Peter Renn, staff attorney at Lambda Legal, an LGBT legal organization. He is working on Carcaño v McCrory, which was filed in March by the ACLU, Lambda Legal and other organizations against the NC law