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What we know about EgyptAir Flight 804




Mervit Mounir (L), and Answar Moissen, talk with journalists in front of the Egypt Air In flight services building where family and friends of the Egypt Air flight are gathering on in Cairo, Egypt. Their relative was on the plan, they last talked with her when she was recently married.
Mervit Mounir (L), and Answar Moissen, talk with journalists in front of the Egypt Air In flight services building where family and friends of the Egypt Air flight are gathering on in Cairo, Egypt. Their relative was on the plan, they last talked with her when she was recently married.
David Degner/Getty Images

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Egyptian authorities now say debris they found in the Mediterranean Sea that had originally been linked to the wreckage from EgyptAir flight 804, which disappeared from radar on Thursday while traveling from Paris to Cairo, is not actually from the wreck of that plane. An EgyptAir official told CNN's Jake Tapper that the original reports were mistaken and that upon closer inspection, the debris was not linked to the missing flight.

66 people, including crew members, were aboard the flight when it disappeared, and the search for the plane's wreckage is ongoing. There are multiple theories about what could've caused the crash, but there are obviously concerns it could be terrorism.

What are investigators looking for right now? What does it mean if terrorism is the cause for teh crash? Could a mechanical failure actually have caused a flight to go missing like this? How will this have an impact on Egyptian tourism, and subsequently the Egyptian economy?

Guests:

Colin Clarke, associate political scientist at RAND Corporation

Jeffrey Price, associate professor of aerospace science at Metropolitan State University of Denver; he is an expert in aviation and airport security and emergency management

Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow at the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs of the American University of Beirut and a nonresident senior fellow in the Middle East Initiative at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs