Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

The twisting path to legalizing same-sex marriage in Mexico




Antonio Medina (L) and Jorge Cerpa are pictured during the first ceremony in Mexico in which a gay couple signs a civil contract that offers same-sex couples the same rights as marriage, on March 16th, 2007 in Mexico City.
Antonio Medina (L) and Jorge Cerpa are pictured during the first ceremony in Mexico in which a gay couple signs a civil contract that offers same-sex couples the same rights as marriage, on March 16th, 2007 in Mexico City.
RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

15:46
Download this story 7MB

Earlier this week Mexico’s president Enrique Pena Nieto proposed amending the constitution to codify same-sex marriage across the country.

He will need two-thirds of Congress to support him and a majority of the 31 states would have to vote in approval. Legal in Mexico City since 2009 and in five states, same-sex marriage remains a controversial issue in the country.

The Supreme Court ruled last year that banning same-sex marriage was unconstitutional but did not go so far as to legalize it themselves, recognizing various local resistance to the change.

How are Mexico’s different regions responding to the push for same-sex marriage rights? What is the landscape of LGBT activism in Mexico? How big a role does religion play in how LGBT rights are viewed by Mexicans?

Guests:

Enrique Torre Molina, campaigns manager at Allout, an international LGBT rights organization, and long-time LGBT rights activist in Mexico; he tweets @eTorreMolina

Andrew Selee, executive vice president and senior advisor to the Mexico Institute at the Wilson Center