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When a child lies, a parent’s ability to tell they are doing so sometimes dies




A study completed by Canadian researchers suggests that parents are particularly bad at telling when their own child is not telling the truth.
A study completed by Canadian researchers suggests that parents are particularly bad at telling when their own child is not telling the truth.
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Not to say any of us are good at telling when children lie or not, but a study completed by Canadian researchers suggests that parents are particularly bad at telling when their own child is not telling the truth.

Why is this? The parents were “very confident” in their answer that their child wasn’t lying, revealing a “truth bias,” where we tend to trust and believe the people with whom we have close relationships.

But we also know it’s not as simple as that. Sometimes we might accept a child’s lie because we know they can’t communicate their true feelings or because, maybe with older children, calling it out would just lead to more drama.

Do you have a story of believing your child and later learning the truth? Or perhaps you recall a time when you lied to your parents and got away with it… and are now second-guessing whether you really did. Call us at 866-893-5722.