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Freddie Gray Ruling: Analyzing Edward Nero’s acquittal




Baltimore City Sheriff's Deputies surround and protect Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero's family members as demonstrators and members of the news media crowd around the Mitchell Courthouse-West after Nero was found not guilty on all charges against him related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland.
Baltimore City Sheriff's Deputies surround and protect Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero's family members as demonstrators and members of the news media crowd around the Mitchell Courthouse-West after Nero was found not guilty on all charges against him related to the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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A Baltimore police officer has been acquitted of misdemeanor charges in the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Officer Edward Nero was accused of assaulting Gray and arresting him without probable cause in April 2015. He was also accused of being negligent in not buckling Gray into a police van; Gray’s neck was broken while in the van. An attorney for Nero says it was the responsibility of the van’s driver, and not Nero, to ensure that Gray was wearing a seatbelt, and Nero did not knowingly break police procedure, or the law.

Nero faced charges of second-degree assault, recklessness endangerment and misconduct in office. He is the second officer in the Freddie Gray case to appear in court. What implications will this have for the remaining officers in the case?

Guest:

David Jaros, Professor of Law, University of Baltimore