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KPCC listeners remember The Greatest: Muhammad Ali




27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
27th May 1963: Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
Kent Gavin/Getty Images
27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
American boxer Muhammad Ali, the world heavyweight champion, has his hands bandaged by his manager Angelo Dundee before the day's training session at the Territorial Army Gymnasium at White City, London.
Keystone/Getty Images
27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
23 MAY 1966: HENRY COOPER OF GREAT BRITAIN AND CASSIUS CLAY OF THE UNITED STATES IN ACTION DURING THEIR WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE FIGHT.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
MAY 21, 1966 - LONDON: American boxer and world heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali throws a long right to British challenger Henry Cooper's injured left eye in the sixth round of their world heavyweight championship fight at Highbury Stadium, London.
Keystone/Getty Images
27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
19th December 1978: Heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali with his daughters Laila (9 months) and Hanna (2 years 5 months) at Grosvenor House.
Frank Tewkesbury/Getty Images
27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
US President George W. Bush (R) presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civil award,to boxer Muhammad Ali in the East Room of the White House 09 November 2005 in Washington, DC. The medal is presented to those who have made contributions to national security, world peace, or culture.It was Ali's first public appearance in five months.
MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
27th May 1963:  Supremely confident American boxer Cassius Clay holds up five fingers in a prediction of how many rounds it will take him to knock out British boxer Henry Cooper.
Flowers and boxing gloves are seen as people leave items to pay their respects to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at the Muhammad Ali Center June 5, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images


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He was a massive fighter, a massive force, so days after his death at age 74, fascinating stories about Muhammad Ali abound. 

He was a massive fighter, a massive force, so days after his death at age 74, fascinating stories about Muhammad Ali abound. As Stephen Battaglio commemorates in the LA Times, a hugely significant relationship in Ali's life was with sportscaster Howard Cosell.

The rapport between the charismatic, unconventional boxer and the measured broadcaster was captivating for viewers.

For AirTalk listeners, whether it was Ali's impact on his sport or his impact on society, share your thoughts on his incredible life.

Guest:

Stephen BattaglioStaff writer for The Los Angeles Times covering TV and media biz out of New York; LA Times: Muhammad Ali and Howard Cosell were must-see sports TV