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As economists increasingly uncertain about growth, a look at economies in election years




A trader is reflected in a market screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City.
A trader is reflected in a market screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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Business economists are giving a more pessimistic outlook about U.S. economic growth this year for the third consecutive month and uncertainty over the November presidential election has proven to be damaging.

The median estimate from economists surveyed by the National Association for Business Economics calls for gross domestic product growth of only 1.8 percent, down from the 2.2 percent forecast in March.

The outlook for next year calls for 2.3 percent growth. And the latest red flag came from last week’s disappointing jobs report.

*With Files from AP

Guest:

Julian Zelizer,  Professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University and a fellow at the New America Foundation. His latest book is, “The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society.” (Penguin Press, 2015)