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The joys of reading children’s books…as an adult




Jennifer Reckner (L), and Jessica Beegle (R), from Manassas, Virgina, read the final book in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series,
Jennifer Reckner (L), and Jessica Beegle (R), from Manassas, Virgina, read the final book in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows."
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

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Have you revisited a book you loved as a child?

Did the stories  hold new meaning once you were grown?  Once upon a time, it was somewhat embarrassing for an adult to be caught reading a book written for kids. But that time is long gone. The popularity of the Harry Potter series, the Hunger Games, and titles like the Faults in Our Stars have shown that books meant for kids and teenagers are also successful in attracting grown-ups for a second read.

In fact, a 2012 study found that 55 percent of readers of the young adult (YA) genre are actually adults. 

What are your favorite children's books? Which books do you enjoy reading or re-reading as an adult, or to your children? Call 866-893-5722 and let us know.

Guest:

Phillip Nel, a professor of English and a director of the graduate program in children’s literature at Kansas State University



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