Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Olympic historian on what Rio’s 'state of calamity' means for 2016 Summer Games




Competitors jump into the waters of Copacabana beach as they take part in the Marathon Swimming Challenge - Aquece Rio Test Event for Rio 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Competitors jump into the waters of Copacabana beach as they take part in the Marathon Swimming Challenge - Aquece Rio Test Event for Rio 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Listen to story

08:38
Download this story 4MB

As if this summer’s Olympic Games didn’t already have enough baggage with worries about the Zika virus and political unrest brewing underneath the surface, Rio de Janeiro's governor declared a “state of calamity” on Friday, saying that the state government wouldn’t be able to meet its financial commitment for the Games because it is bankrupt.

Interim Governor Francisco Dornelles said in the decree that Rio would need emergency funds to prevent things like public security and health, infrastructure, and the education system from collapsing.

Rio 2016 says it was aware of the financial crisis in Rio when they decided to hold the Olympics there, and that a state law for tax breaks that was created to help fund the games will provide assistance.

Guest:

David Wallechinsky, President of the International Society of Olympic Historians and author of “The Complete Book of the Olympics” (Aurum Press, 2012)