Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Vice presidential experts handicap VP picks for presumptive nominees




U.S. Sen Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) (R) addresses the crowd as Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton looks on during a campaign rally in Cincinnati, Ohio.
U.S. Sen Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) (R) addresses the crowd as Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton looks on during a campaign rally in Cincinnati, Ohio.
John Sommers II/Getty Images

Listen to story

13:30
Download this story 6MB

With only a few weeks left until the start of the political conventions, we’re expecting the presumptive nominees to announce their running mates soon.

While the choice for each candidate will likely hinge on how qualified that person is to be one heartbeat away from the presidency, there’s also the campaign image factor to consider.

The person a presidential candidate chooses as a vice president often has huge impact on how voters view the candidate, and can even be the difference that pushes a voter to one side or another or even from one side or another.

Pundits and election-watchers have been speculating for months on who the presumptive nominees might choose, and shortlists for both Trump and Clinton are starting to form, but neither campaign has tipped its hand yet on who is really being considered.

Who are the contenders on each side? Who has the best chances of being selected? What are the candidates looking for in a running mate? Who can accomplish the most for them in terms of garnering more votes?

Guests:

Kyle Kopko, associate professor of political science at Elizabethtown College in Pennsylvania and co-author of “The VP Advantage: How Running Mates Influence Home State Voting in Presidential Elections” (Manchester University Press, 2016)

Jennifer Lawless, professor of government at American University and author of “Running from Office: Why Young Americans Are Turned Off To Politics” (Oxford University Press, 2016)



You care about today's news. And you're not alone.

Join others who support independent journalism.