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Politics

AirTalk listeners look back on a wild week in Cleveland




Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech during the evening session on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech during the evening session on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention on July 21, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Donald Trump closed out the Republican National Convention last night with the longest acceptance speech since 1972.

According to his strategists, the speech was intended to bring in a cross-section of Americans, including those who aren't yet on Trump's side.

AirTalk listeners from across the Southland offered their thoughts about Trump’s remarks.

Did his depiction of the country and his pitch that he's the one to fix it connect with Southern Californians?

As an undecided voter, did Trump pull you closer with his speech last night?

JP in Redondo Beach: Before last night, I was an avid Trump hater. He really did pull me in closer with what he was saying...Hearing what Obama was saying this morning, it kind of made me second guess what [Trump] had to say. In the midst of hearing of what he was saying, it really pulled me in and didn’t let me go. 

Was part of that that you felt that the country Trump was describing was what you see?

JP: A little bit. It really felt like he was playing on the fact that we have these anxieties and these fears of what’s going on and what the news is portraying the world as.

 

Did Trump’s speech make inroads with women in Southern California? 

Laura in West LA: I’ve been a Bernie supporter the entire primary season. Not only did Trump’s speech repel me from him, it made me not only [want to] vote for Hillary Clinton, but campaign for her. I find Donald Trump repugnant. I think he is a psychopath and needs to be kept out of the White House by any means necessary. 

Lisa in Mar Vista: I think Trump did a great job, but I think it is in part due to his daughter Ivanka. I think she did a great job of representing the female voice and what he stands for. I think a lot of women resonate with the whole protector and provider role that Trump portrays: wanting to be able to protect our citizens, protect our children, and protect women. As a former Democrat who is now thinking about voting for a Republican, I think he did a great job. I think his family did an amazing job representing him. What they say is your children are a reflection of you. 

Amy in West LA: I was very surprised by Trump’s gesture last night towards his daughter [Ivanka] when he took the stage from her. He patted her on the rear, in the way that one does a house pet, or some furry animal. It’s not a gesture that one makes among equals. It reminded me that the night before he had gestured toward his wife’s figure in a way that in that moment I thought was merely coincidental. But the pat really knocked me for a loop. I wonder what other professional women think of this, young and old. 

If it didn’t bother his daughter or his wife, is that okay? 

Amy: Well, no, because some women will put up with that. But if that’s a gesture he’s accustomed to making in public in front of lots of people, I suspect he would make it [in] the workplace as well...I’m not a prude, but that’s a gesture I don’t care for even from my husband, whom I adore.

It sounds like it didn’t just offend you, it revealed something about his view of women.

Amy: Absolutely.

These interviews have been edited for clarity. You can listen to the full segment by clicking the blue play button above.

Guests:

Louis Desipio, Director, Center for the Study of Democracy at University of California, Irvine

Sean T. Walsh, Republican political analyst and partner at Wilson Walsh Consulting in San Francisco; he is a former adviser to California Governors Pete Wilson and Arnold Schwarzenegger and a former staffer in the George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan White Houses