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Politics

Trump dropping out rumors are just rumors, but is now the time if he’s going to do it?




Paul Manafort, national chairman of Donald Trump's campaign, checks the teleprompters before Trump's speech at the Mayflower Hotel April 27, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Paul Manafort, national chairman of Donald Trump's campaign, checks the teleprompters before Trump's speech at the Mayflower Hotel April 27, 2016 in Washington, DC.
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Rumors have been circulating this week that RNC Chair Reince Priebus and members of the Trump campaign are in talks over whether Donald Trump might actually withdraw from the Republican ticket.

Many have brushed off the notion as wishful thinking on the part of some Republican elected officials, but then Trump’s campaign manager Paul Manafort accidentally endorsed House Speaker Paul Ryan for President on Thursday.

So what would happen if he were to withdraw?

According to RNC rule No. 9, “If a presidential nominee dies or withdraws, the RNC is empowered to replace her or him via one of two methods: (1) a vote by the RNC itself in which each state would cast the same number of votes as it possessed at the recent national convention, or (2) an actual reconvening of said convention.”

The only recent precedent was in 1972 when the Democratic VP nominee, Senator Tom Eagleton, withdrew from the ticket a couple weeks after the convention after it came to light that he has several DUIs.

Guests:

Dan Schnur, director of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at USC and adjunct faculty at USC Annenberg School

Jeffrey Lord, a contributing editor to The American Spectator, a former aide to Ronald Reagan and author of "What America Needs: The Case for Trump"