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The ins and outs of packaging the Olympics




 Flag bearer Michael Phelps of the United States and Ibtihaj Muhammad lead the U.S. Olympic Team during the Opening Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Maracana Stadium on August 5, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Flag bearer Michael Phelps of the United States and Ibtihaj Muhammad lead the U.S. Olympic Team during the Opening Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Maracana Stadium on August 5, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Julian Finney/Getty Images

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If you’re normally someone who avoids watching sports, the Olympics may be the exception.

Even with all of Rio’s controversies, the country’s landscape combined with athletes’ stories and struggles for one moment of glory may be the driving force to watch.

But there are downsides to this year’s Olympics coverage. With Rio four hours ahead of Los Angeles time, spoilers for who wins the gold are rampant on social media or news alerts. That’s what happened to many fans of the games last night, when Michael Phelps won the 4x100 freestyle relay.

And with streaming even more popular since the last games, will the Olympics beat out binge-watching your favorite Netflix series?

If you don’t normally watch sports, why do you watch the Olympics? How do you avoid spoilers with Rio’s time difference?

Guest:

Andrew Wallenstein, co-editor-in-chief for “Variety”; he tweets from @awallenstein