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Shaming dopers, is it unsportsmanlike or justified?




USA's Lilly King (L) poses with her gold medal next to silver medalist Russia's Yulia Efimova after she won the Women's 100m Breaststroke Final during the swimming event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro on August 8, 2016.
USA's Lilly King (L) poses with her gold medal next to silver medalist Russia's Yulia Efimova after she won the Women's 100m Breaststroke Final during the swimming event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro on August 8, 2016.
ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

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It seems every Olympic year the games arrive hand-in-hand with a doping scandal.

This summer is no different with Russia’s track team almost being banned, and many teams including, the U.S., bringing athletes with sullied pasts - but there is a difference in the way that clean-record athletes are speaking publically about those who’ve previously served doping suspensions.

On Monday night the 100-meter women’s swim meet was more tense than usual after 19-year-old U.S. swimmer Lily King commented on her Russian competitor Yulia Efimova’s history with performance enhancing drugs. Efimova, 24, recently served a 16-month suspension for doping and was only cleared for the Olympic games last Saturday.

Is it unsportsmanlike for Olympic athletes to call out competitors with doping histories, or are their comments justified?

Guest:

Paul DiMeo, a scholar at the University of Stirling in Scotland, whose research focuses on sports policy and drugs in sport. He is the author of “A History of Drug Use in Sport: 1876 – 1976: Beyond Good and Evil” (Routledge, 2007)