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Could you pass a citizenship test?




Republican candidate for President Donald Trump holds a campaign event at the Kilcawley Center at Youngstown State University on August 15, 2016 in Youngstown, Ohio. In his address, Trump laid out his foreign policy vision for America, including an
Republican candidate for President Donald Trump holds a campaign event at the Kilcawley Center at Youngstown State University on August 15, 2016 in Youngstown, Ohio. In his address, Trump laid out his foreign policy vision for America, including an "ideological screening test" for Muslim immigrants.
Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

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Donald Trump was challenged Monday with taking a U.S. citizenship test by Khizr Khan, a Muslim- American man who made waves with his speech at the Democratic National Convention last month.

Khan is the father of a Muslim-American war hero who was killed in battle, fighting for the U.S.

This comes on the heels of Trump’s foreign policy address in Ohio. The GOP presidential nominee is calling for a new test for visa applicants as part of a vetting process.

It is uncertain if Trump will accept the challenge. A long-standing argument with the naturalization test is whether U.S. citizens born in the country could pass it.

Patt Morrison speaks to a civic engagement specialist today, to weigh in on the test’s standards and find out the likelihood of the average American passing the U.S. Naturalization test.

Take the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services practice Civics Test here.

Guests:

Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, Ph.D., Director, Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University

Ted McConnell, executive director, Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools, a coalition of over 70 national civic learning, education, civic engagement and business groups committed to improving the quality and quantity of civic learning in American schools