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Arts & Entertainment

Is Netflix the future of television?




This picture taken on September 11, 2014 shows the on-demand internet streaming media provider, Netflix, on a smartphone.
This picture taken on September 11, 2014 shows the on-demand internet streaming media provider, Netflix, on a smartphone.
JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images

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Sci-fi mystery show “Stranger Things” has become the latest Netflix darling. Since the debut of “House of Cards” in 2013, Netflix has put considerable resources in developing a slate of original scripted series.

Its slate of original programming – from “Orange is the New Black” to “Lady Dynamite” – has won industry accolades as well as praise from both viewers and critics.

Netflix is rolling out with 600 hours of original content this year. The move might be great for cord-cutters and fans, but it has incurred the wrath of at least one person. At a recent Television Critics Association event, FX Networks chief John Landgraf slammed Netflix for exercising too much of a “monopoly” over good scripts and the television production community. He went on to question whether the streaming site can handle the challenges of creating so many shows and still maintain quality.

Is Landgraf’s charge fair? Is Netflix’s all-in push into original programming sustainable as a business model? Can Netflix become the Airbnb, or the Uber of its industry, with Hulu and Amazon and others nipping at its heels.

Guests:

Dominic Patten, Senior editor and chief television critic, Deadline. He tweets from @DeadlineDominic

Ben Bajarin, principal analyst at the Silicon Valley-based market research firm, Creative Strategies, where he focuses on research in consumer technology; he tweets from @BenBajarin