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Supreme Court Nomination: A second wind for Judge Merrick Garland?




U.S. Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland looks on during a photo opportunity before a private meeting with Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) in Franken's office on Capitol Hill, March 30, 2016 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland looks on during a photo opportunity before a private meeting with Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) in Franken's office on Capitol Hill, March 30, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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“We can't wait any longer to restore our Supreme Court to full capacity. Tell Senate leaders: It's time for a vote.”

That’s the message sent out yesterday by Twitter handle @BarackObama, run by the grassroots group Organizing for Action.

Senate Republicans have been stonewalling a vote on the president’s current nominee, Judge Merrick Garland, since March. So far the GOP has been stalling the vote for the next 9th Justice until after the presidential election. Donald Trump has been very supportive of continuing to block Garland. But as the Republican presidential nominee‘s numbers continue to sink, there’s been renewed interest in voting on the moderate justice nominee now.

Republican Garland supporters think waiting to vote runs the risk of a more liberal Supreme Court candidate from the potential Clinton Administration.

Is the renewed interest in Garland an effort by some Republicans lawmakers to distance themselves from an increasingly unpopular Trump? Is Judge Garland the safest bet for Republicans to fill the empty Supreme Court seat?

Guests:

John Eastman, professor of law and founding director of the Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence at Chapman University

Lisa Camooso Miller, Republican strategist and partner at Reset Public Affairs, a public affairs firm based in D.C.; she tweets@camoosomiller