Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

New study on dwindling exchange options raises questions over ACA sustainability




2012: A doctor speaks with a patient. A new analysis from Kaiser Family Foundation found that starting in 2017, about a third of U.S. counties will only have one insurance carrier in operation.
2012: A doctor speaks with a patient. A new analysis from Kaiser Family Foundation found that starting in 2017, about a third of U.S. counties will only have one insurance carrier in operation.
Adam Berry/Getty Images

Listen to story

13:01
Download this story 6MB

A new analysis from Kaiser Family Foundation found that starting in 2017, about a third of U.S. counties will only have one insurance carrier in operation, raising questions over consumer choice, and how a lack of competition will impact how much consumers will pay for health insurance.

The analysis also found that in another 31 percent of U.S. counties, only two insurance carrier options would be available. 

California counties are not impacted by this trend. The study found that 47 percent of counties in the state would have 2 insurers in 2017, and the remaining 53 percent would have 3 or more insurers.

How does shrinking carrier options impact the Affordable Care Act? What could be done to fix the problem? Despite the plethora of insurance carrier options California enjoy, will the state still be impacted by ACA-related instability in other parts of the nation?

Guests:         

Shana Charles, assistant professor in the department of health sciences at Cal State Fullerton

Avik Roy, opinion editor at Forbes, and former policy advisor to Marco Rubio, Rick Perry and Mitt Romney



You care about today's news. And you're not alone.

Join others who support independent journalism.