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Members of this cinematic group risked legal jeopardy for the sake of film collections




 A man prepares a reel of film before its screening at the 30th Deauville American Film Festival on September 5, 2004 in Deauville, France.
A man prepares a reel of film before its screening at the 30th Deauville American Film Festival on September 5, 2004 in Deauville, France.
Bruno Vincent/Getty Images

Before there were Blu-rays and DVDs, an underground subculture obsessed with owning physical film reels existed.

This quickly vanishing film-crazed group includes RoboCop executive producer Jon Davison, 1950s Hollywood heartthrob actor Rock Hudson and a one-legged former Broadway dancer who lives in a world of decaying movie memories.

A Thousand Cuts: The Bizarre Underground World of  Collectors and Dealers who Saved the Movies” explains the group in detail --along with their strong desire to own a physical copy of a film-- and also examines the FBI’s and Justice Department’s 1970s campaign aimed at harassing and intimidating film dealers.

Co-authors Dennis Bartok and Jeff Joseph join Larry Mantle in studio to talk about their new book.       

Guests:

Dennis Bartok, co-author of the book, “A Thousand Cuts: The Bizarre Underground World of  Collectors and Dealers who Saved the Movies;” he is also head of distribution for art-house distributor Cinelicious Pics

Jeff Joseph, co-author of the book, “A Thousand Cuts: The Bizarre Underground World of  Collectors and Dealers who Saved the Movies;” and a motion picture archivist