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Leaks 2.0: how the deluge of hacked data is changing news and public sentiments




 Participants work at their their laptops at the annual Chaos Computer Club computer hackers' congress, called 29C3, on December 28, 2012 in Hamburg, Germany.
Participants work at their their laptops at the annual Chaos Computer Club computer hackers' congress, called 29C3, on December 28, 2012 in Hamburg, Germany.
Patrick Lux/Getty Images

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The leaks beat is busy with news from Guccifer 2.0, Fancy Bears, DCLeaks.com and the campaign to pardon Edward Snowden.

In the last 24 hours, various hackers have released medical records of U.S. Olympic athletes, personal Powell’s emails belonging to former US defense secretary Colin Powell in which he eviscerates Donald Trump, another batch of Democratic party emails, and reportedly the cellphone number of vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine.

The rise of websites such as WikiLeaks and the prominence of whistleblowers like Edward Snowden who leak classified information to the public have no doubt contributed to the ubiquity and proliferation of leaks in our daily news cycle. In some cases, like Snowden's, whistleblowers attain almost celebrity status. Granted, Snowden is wanted by the U.S. government and lives in exile, but he’s seen by many as sort of a modern day Robin Hood, stealing information from the powerful to share with the public. We’ve come a long way since the Pentagon Papers and Daniel Ellsberg who needed the aid of newspaper editors to publish secret documents about the Vietnam War (not to mention the help of photocopiers).

How are editors handling the deluge of data dumps? What is the impact on the public’s faith in institutions and leaders? Is the news outlets’ traditional role as gatekeepers an outdated concept?

Guest:

Hadas Gold, media reporter for POLITICO, where she also runs their blog ‘On Media’; she tweets @Hadas_Gold