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What comes next as Syrian ceasefire appears to crumble




TOPSHOT - Kurdish fighters belonging to the police force -- the Asayesh -- and the People's Protection Units (YPG) stand in front of a building covered in bullet holes in the northeastern Syrian city of Hasakeh on August 23, 2016.
TOPSHOT - Kurdish fighters belonging to the police force -- the Asayesh -- and the People's Protection Units (YPG) stand in front of a building covered in bullet holes in the northeastern Syrian city of Hasakeh on August 23, 2016.
DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/Getty Images

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NEW YORK (AP) - Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday expressed hope that a cease-fire in Syria brokered by the United States and Russia could still hold, despite a declaration from the Syrian military that the truce is over amid other indications the latest international attempt to quiet the fighting has failed.

Shortly after Syria's armed forces declared that the truce was dead and blamed opposition rebels for undermining it, Kerry noted that the cease-fire had not produced the desired reduction in violence and sustained delivery of humanitarian aid. But he said some aid was finally moving. "We have not had seven days of calm and of delivery of humanitarian goods," Kerry told reporters on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly. Those seven days of calm and aid deliveries were required before the U.S. and Russia could embark on a plan to cooperate in targeting the Islamic State group and al-Qaida affiliates working in Syria. He denounced the Syrian military declaration, but also suggested that Russia was partly to blame

Assuming it lasts through the weekend (and even if it does) the latest on the civil war in Syria. He denounced the Syrian military declaration, but also suggested that Russia was partly to blame.

Guests: 

Liz Sly, Washington Post Beirut bureau chief covering Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and beyond

Mohsen Milani, Executive Director, USF World Center for Strategic & Diplomatic Studies Professor, Department of Government & International Affairs, University of South Florida