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A Nation Engaged: Economists dissect Clinton, Trump economic policy proposals




This combination of file photos shows Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (L) on June 15, 2016 and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on June 13, 2016.
This combination of file photos shows Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (L) on June 15, 2016 and Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on June 13, 2016.
DSK/AFP/Getty Images

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Only eight years removed from The Great Recession, the United States economy has gotten back on track, at least comparatively.

Job production is up and despite trailing other countries in wage growth, people are making more money than they were eight years ago. In fact, the middle class just got its first raise in eight years, according to new Census data. With the election in full swing and the economy one of the biggest issues for voters in the election, how are each of the candidates planning to spur economic growth?

Hillary Clinton’s plan will raise the minimum wage, raise capital gains tax, and cut taxes for small businesses and the middle class. Donald Trump says he wants to simplify the income tax system and turn seven brackets into 3, roll back regulations on American businesses, and repeal Obamacare.

How will the candidates’ plans impact the U.S. economy positively or negatively? What will the effects be on Southern California? Larry will chat with expert economists to get the lowdown on the two presidential frontrunners’ economic policy plans.

Series: A Nation Engaged

Much of the anger and anxiety in the 2016 election are fueled by the sense that economic opportunity is slipping away for many Americans. As part of our collaborative project with NPR called "A Nation Engaged," this week we're asking: What can be done to create economic opportunity for more Americans?

Read more in this series and let us know your thoughts in the comments section below or on Facebook.

Guests:

Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank; he is former director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (2003-2005), chief economist of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers (2001-2002), and as director of domestic and economic policy for John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign; he tweets @djheakin

Tamara Draut, Vice President of Policy at Demos - a public policy organization focused on equity; Author of the brand new book, “Sleeping Giant: How the New Working Class Will Transform America” (Doubleday; April 2016); she tweets from @tamaradraut