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ACLU investigation: Twitter, FB, Instagram provided data to help police track protesters




In this photo illustration the Social networking site Facebook is displayed on a laptop screen on March 25, 2009 in London, England.
In this photo illustration the Social networking site Facebook is displayed on a laptop screen on March 25, 2009 in London, England.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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An ACLU investigation has found that three of the most popular social networking sites in the country – Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram—were giving user data to a surveillance software developed by a company called Geofeedia, which law enforcement agencies in Oakland, Calif., and Baltimore, Mo., allegedly used to track protesters.

The ACLU learned about Geofeedia and its use by police departments from public records requests to a number of law enforcement agencies.

Should law enforcement be able to obtain social media data to monitor protests? Is it a violation of the privacy of users?

Guests:

Malkia Cyril, Executive Director of The Center for Media Justice, a nonprofit that promotes digital equity. She has spearheaded national grassroots efforts for Net Neutrality, and against mass digital surveillance. She is a co-signer of a letter that the ACLU has sent to various social media sites over its Geofeedia investigation

Ronald T. Hosko, President of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund, a nonprofit in Virginia. He is also former head of the FBI’s criminal investigative division