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After Gropegate, women remember and reframe their own sex assaults




Activists rally during a protest against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for his 'treatment of women' in front of Trump Tower on October 17, 2016 in New York City.
Activists rally during a protest against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump for his 'treatment of women' in front of Trump Tower on October 17, 2016 in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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Since The Washington Post broke the story earlier this month about Donald Trump’s lewd comments, women continue to come forward, accusing Trump of sexual assault and groping.

But the allegations against Trump have stirred up emotion far beyond the presidential campaign. There has been an outpouring of articles and social media posts about women’s experiences of groping, sexual harassment and sexual assault. And the news about Trump sparked a larger conversation about how people may be changing the way they react to these situations.

As reported in The New York Times, author Kelly Oxford asked women to tweet her their first assaults. The tweet garnered close to 27 million responses in one weekend. And hashtags such as #notokay are showing posts of statistics, personal stories and memes about sexual assault.

How has the recent news about Trump’s accusers changed the way you perceived sexual assault? Has the news brought to light past experiences of groping, sexual harassment and assault and how you thought about them?

Guest:

Susan Dominus, staff writer for The New York Times Magazine; she wrote the recent article, “After Donald Trump, Will More Women Believe Their Own Stories?