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Wasteful Pentagon spending and what Trump’s national defense plans mean for CA’s economy




Aerial photo of the Pentagon in Arlington, Virgina on September 26, 2003.  (Photo by Andy Dunaway/USAF via Getty Images)
Aerial photo of the Pentagon in Arlington, Virgina on September 26, 2003. (Photo by Andy Dunaway/USAF via Getty Images)
U.S. Air Force/Getty Images

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According to an investigation by The Washington Post, the Pentagon has buried evidence of $125 billion in administrative waste.

These numbers were revealed with an internal 2015 study by the Defense Business Board, an internal group of federal advisors for the secretary and deputy secretary of defense.

The study showed that nearly a quarter of the Pentagon’s $580 billion dollar budget had been spent on back-office bureaucracy, employing over a million military personnel, civilians and contractors, which adds up to almost the same amount of people as active duty troops.

The Post’s investigation showed that spending was suppressed due to fears that Congress would curtail the defense budget. Cuts would have included early retirement, improved use of information technology and less expenses for contractors.

Craig Whitlock of the Washington Post weighs in on these findings, and goes in-depth on the investigation, while Jerry Nickelsburg of the UCLA Anderson forecast discusses the implications of Trump’s national defense spending on California’s economy.

Guests:

Craig Whitlock, investigative reporter, The Washington Post

Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct full professor at the UCLA Anderson Forecast, which released its projections for the economy under Trump’s administration