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New Congress identifies as far more Christian than the rest of the country




Republican members of Congress listen as U.S. President Barack Obama addresses a Joint Session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol September 8, 2011 in Washington, DC.
Republican members of Congress listen as U.S. President Barack Obama addresses a Joint Session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol September 8, 2011 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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The Pew Research Center recently analyzed the religious composition of the newly-elected 115th Congress.

The research found that even though there are fewer adults today who call themselves Christian, Congress remains overwhelmingly Christian. Approximately 91 percent of Congress described themselves as Christian, while just 71 percent of surveyed adults used the same description. Researchers found that both chambers are heavily Christian and reflect about the same percentages as was recorded in 1961.

What do these numbers tell us? Is congressional religious affiliation important to you as a voter?

Read the full report below: 

Faith on the Hill by Southern California Public Radio on Scribd

Guest:

Greg Smith, Associate Director of Religion Research at the Pew Research Center