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Jobs, environmental and cultural concerns at stake in Trump’s Keystone XL/DAPL executive order




Miles of unused pipe, prepared for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, sit in a lot on October 14, 2014 outside Gascoyne, North Dakota.
Miles of unused pipe, prepared for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, sit in a lot on October 14, 2014 outside Gascoyne, North Dakota.
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

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(AP) -- President Donald Trump has signed executive actions to advance the construction of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines.

Trump tells reporters in the Oval Office that the construction of the pipelines will be subject to the terms and conditions being renegotiated by the U.S. Former President Barack Obama killed the proposed Keystone XL pipeline in late 2015, saying it would hurt American efforts to reach a global climate change deal. The pipeline would run from Canada to U.S. refineries in the Gulf Coast.

The U.S. government needs to approve the pipeline because it crossed the border. The Army decided last year to explore alternate routes for the Dakota pipeline after the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters said the pipeline threatened drinking water and Native American cultural sites.

Guests:

Timothy Cama, energy and environmental reporter for The Hill

John Stoody, Vice President of Government and Public Relations with the Association of Oil Pipelines, a DC-based industry group involved in the North Dakota Pipeline project

Susan Casey-Lefkowitz, Director of the International Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council

Kandi Mossett, campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network, a network of Indigenous, grassroots and environmental activists; she is also American Indian