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What new South Coast AQMD smog rules could mean for future business, pollution in SoCal




The downtown skyline is enveloped in smog shortly before sunset on November 17, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.
The downtown skyline is enveloped in smog shortly before sunset on November 17, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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In the hopes of reducing smog pollution over the next 15 years, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) is expected to approve a new pollution reduction plan today that, rather than start with a more traditional approach of setting blanket regulations, will allow the industry to regulate itself.

Rail yards, warehouses, the ports, and more will be able to set their own emissions goals, provided that they meet certain standards and are enforceable. AQMD is also expected to adopt a stricter policy on refineries, ports, and other big facilities that produce much of the pollution in Southern California.

Proponents welcome the changes as a way to get more done by including everyone at the table in a collaborative effort to cut emissions. Critics argue that the plan is a step backwards with regards to previous work the AQMD did to reduce and regulate emissions in the nation’s smoggiest region. They also question how much federal oversight there will be under the Trump Administration when it comes to California’s pollution reduction standards.

Guests: 

Evan Gillespie, a campaign director for Sierra Club who is at the meeting this morning

Stuart Waldman, president of the Valley Industry and Commerce Association



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