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Sunday marks 75th anniversary of Roosevelt signing Japanese-American Internment Executive Order




Offerings hang on the barded wire fence surrounding the cemetery of the Manzanar War Relocation Center June 25, 2000 south of Independence, CA.
Offerings hang on the barded wire fence surrounding the cemetery of the Manzanar War Relocation Center June 25, 2000 south of Independence, CA.
David McNew / Staff

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It’s been nearly 75 years since President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order which led to the internment of approximately 120,000 Japanese-Americans.

The Day of Remembrance commemorates that move, and AirTalk is delving into what led up to the order that displaced so many Americans.

As part of that conversation, Larry speaks with one of those former internees, Jim Matsuoka, who at the age of 7, was taken with his family out of Los Angeles and forced to move to the Manzanar War Relocation Center in Central California. He lived there for three years.

Larry also talks to Lon Kurashige, who will be speaking about his book, “Two Faces of Exclusion: The Untold History of Anti-Asian Racism in the United States,” on March 25 at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo. For more information, click here

Guests: 

Lon Kurashige, professor of history at the University of Southern California and author of “Two Faces of Exclusion: The Untold History of Anti-Asian Racism in the United States” (University of North Carolina Press, 2016)

Jim Matsuoka, former internee; he lived at the Manzanar War Relocation Center in Central California for three years.