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The best and worst of Oscar 2017 mishaps, upsets and triumphs




US director Barry Jenkins (C) speaks after
US director Barry Jenkins (C) speaks after "Moonlight" won the Best Film award as Host Jimmy Kimmel (L) looks on at the 89th Oscars on February 26, 2017 in Hollywood, California.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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In the final stretch of the Oscar campaign race, "Moonlight" and "La La Land" were neck and neck, and it seems they were destined to remain so even after the best picture award was handed out mistakenly, and now infamously, to "La La Land" instead of the true winner "Moonlight."

The accounting firm responsible for Oscar awards and envelopes issued an apology for the error. PwC - formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers - explained:

We sincerely apologize to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for Best Picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened...

"La La Land" still collected a leading six awards, including honors for cinematography, production design, score, the song "City of Stars" and best director. "Moonlight" won three in total, including best writing (adapted) and best supporting actor.

Throughout the awards show, host Jimmy Kimmel and numerous presenters and winners made political statements critical of the Trump administration.

Kimmel made the most out of President Donald Trump famously calling much-decorated Meryl Streep "overrated." Kimmel said Streep had "stood the test of time for her many uninspiring and overrated performances" and "phoned it in for more than 50 films." Streep, who has been unstinting in her criticism of Trump, received a standing ovation.

With files from the Associated Press.

Guest:

Nicole Sperling, Senior Writer, Entertainment Weekly  



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