Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

A debate on ethics as anti-Planned Parenthood activists charged with felonies




David Daleiden, a defendant in an indictment stemming from a Planned Parenthood video he helped produce, arrives for court at the Harris County Courthouse.
David Daleiden, a defendant in an indictment stemming from a Planned Parenthood video he helped produce, arrives for court at the Harris County Courthouse.
Eric Kayne/Getty Images

Listen to story

11:29
Download this story 5MB

David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt, the two anti-abortion activists responsible for taping and releasing videos inside Planned Parenthood facilities around California have been charged with 15 felony counts.

The charges focused on the violation of privacy by recording confidential information without the health providers’ consent. In this particular case, State General Attorney Xavier Becerra said the pair used fake identities to engage with Planned Parenthood officials and recorded their private conversation. Pro-life activists argue the edited videos demonstrated an intent to sell fetal tissues for scientific research, and Daleiden and Merritt’s actions justified the means in which the footage was obtained. Other legal analysts cites the strict “two-party consent” wiretapping law in California, adding that it’s a crime to record communication without the knowledge of all participating parties.

Host Larry Mantle sits down with David Daleiden, the indicted activist, Steve Cooley, his attorney, and law  professor Jane Kirtley, to talk about the legal and ethical dilemma in this case.

Guests: 

David Daleiden, project lead and founder at The Center for Medical Progress

Steve Cooley, attorney representing David Daleiden and founder of the Southern California-based law firm Steve Cooley & Associates; he served as Los Angeles County District Attorney from 2000-2012

Jane Kirtley, professor of media ethics and law at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota