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A personal look at how the Vietnam War changed an entire generation




American army combat platoon leader Second Lieutenant John Libs (center) of 2nd platoon, C Company, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division.
American army combat platoon leader Second Lieutenant John Libs (center) of 2nd platoon, C Company, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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The United States emerged from World War II as one of the planet’s clear-cut superpowers, and many expected the country’s involvement in Vietnam to cement that global position.

But the trials of the Vietnam War left a fractured and complicated legacy that still informs American society to this day.

It’s that legacy that James Wright examines in his new book, “Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War.” In “Enduring Vietnam,” Wright looks not only at the political steps that led to America’s decades-long involvement in Vietnam, but also at the combat experiences and the effects of the war on the soldiers who returned from it.

Crafted from over a hundred interviews with veterans, their families, policy-makers, and historians, “Enduring Vietnam,” creates a vivid portrait of one of the most influential events in contemporary American history.

James Wright will be speaking about his book tonight at 7pm, at the Buena Vista Branch Library in Burbank. For more information, click here.

Guest:

James Wright, president emeritus and Professor of History Emeritus at Dartmouth College and author of “Enduring Vietnam: An American Generation and Its War” ( Thomas Dunne Books, 2017)