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Who wins in the privatization of air traffic control




A jet lands at Los Angeles International Airport on Thanksgiving eve, traditionally the busiest travel day of the year, November 22, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.
A jet lands at Los Angeles International Airport on Thanksgiving eve, traditionally the busiest travel day of the year, November 22, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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President Trump is proposing to privatize the country’s air traffic controller system, and he is looking to our northern neighbor for inspiration.

The system air traffic control system currently being used by Canada is run by a non-government entity and is entirely funded by airport user fees - and that’s what Trump wants the US to do. Supporters of the idea see this as a system free from funding cuts and Washington politics, while opponents see it differently, that privatization could favor commercial airlines and big-city airports.

Guests:

Baruch Feigenbaum, assistant director of transportation policy with Reason Foundation, a libertarian think tank that backs the proposal

Selena Shilad, executive director, Alliance for Aviation Across America, an organization that represents farmers, crop duster pilots and other rural groups