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LA’s Korean American community weighs in on South Korea’s presidential election




Moon Jae-In, presidential election candidate for the Democratic Party of Korea celebrates during the primary election on April 3, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea.
Moon Jae-In, presidential election candidate for the Democratic Party of Korea celebrates during the primary election on April 3, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea.
Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

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South Korean voters have elected Moon Jae-in, leader of the left-of-center Democratic Party, to be their next President.

His election ends nearly a decade of conservative rule in South Korea, and could represent a shift in the country's policy towards North Korea and the U.S. Moon has advocated to renew engagement with their northern neighbor. A rapprochement with North Korea would affect South Korea's relationship with the U.S. and the Trump administration itself, which has been calling for "maximum pressure" on North Korea.

Experts say Moon could be more restrained once he's in office. His party does not have a majority in the National Assembly. The 61-year-old human rights lawyer takes over the mandate of ousted President Park Geun-hye, charged with participating in a corruption scandal.

Los Angeles has a large Korean-American population, many of whom were eligible to vote in the elections in South Korea.

Did you vote in the South Korean election from the U.S.? What do you think are the main concerns of South Korean voters? How would it affect you if tensions increased between South Korea and the U.S.?

Guest:

Sung-Yoon Lee, an expert on the Koreas, and a professor in Korean Studies at The Fletcher School at Tufts University in Massachusetts