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Democrat, Republican analysis of the political process ahead for Trump’s proposed 2018 budget




Stacks of President Donald Trump's FY2018 budget proposal are seen during a photo availability May 23, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. President Trump has sent his FY2018 budget proposal request to the Congress.
Stacks of President Donald Trump's FY2018 budget proposal are seen during a photo availability May 23, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. President Trump has sent his FY2018 budget proposal request to the Congress.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

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Today, President Trump unveiled his $4.1 trillion budget for 2018, which calls for deep cuts to government safety net programs and relies on what some are calling an overly optimistic projection of 3 percent economic growth by 2021.

Food stamps, disability payments, scientific and medical research spending and disease prevention programs would all be taking hits under the budget, which calls for an overall $4.5 trillion cut in federal spending over the next decade. Medicaid would be taking the biggest cut, losing over $800 billion in funding.  

The budget now lies in the hands of Congress – we look at the proposal and get partisan analysis of the coming political process.

Guests:

Brad Sherman, congressman (D-CA) from the 30th U.S. Congressional district, which includes the western San Fernando Valley of LA County and eastern Simi Hills of Ventura County; he is a senior member of the Financial Services Committee, as well as a tax law specialist and a CPA

Tevi Troy, president of the American Health Policy Institute and former deputy to President George W. Bush for domestic policy (2005 to 2007); he is also author of the book, "Shall We Wake the President? Two Centuries of Disaster Management from the Oval Office" (Lyons Press, 2016)



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