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Could we better handle catastrophes if we knew they were coming?




A damaged home is seen in the Lower Ninth Ward on February 22, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana.
A damaged home is seen in the Lower Ninth Ward on February 22, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Cassandra is the character in Greek mythology that correctly predicted future calamities but was condemned to being ignored by all.

In their new book, “Warnings,” national security experts Richard A. Clarke and R.P. Eddy argue that catastrophic events from Hurricane Katrina to the rise of ISIS were all forewarned and could have been prevented, and they set out to answer how we could better go about to preempt the next, big disaster from taking place.  

Guest:

R.P. Eddy, CEO of the New York-based intelligence firm Ergo; former director at the White House National Security Council, as well as a former U.S. and U.N. senior diplomat; he is the co-author of the book, “Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes” (Ecco, 2017) and tweets @RPEddy