Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Not everyone’s happy about LA’s $1 billion plan to fight homelessness




Volunteers count homeless people on a dark street on Skid Row during the 2015 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count conducted by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA).
Volunteers count homeless people on a dark street on Skid Row during the 2015 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count conducted by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA).
David McNew/Getty Images

Listen to story

28:46
Download this story 13MB

The L.A. County Board of Supervisors have authorized broad investments in combatting homelessness totaling nearly $1 billion over the next few years.

Hundreds of millions of dollars raised under Measure H, a sales tax which kicks in Oct. 1, will go into new homeless shelters, rental subsidies, and supportive services to try to stem the region's growing homeless crisis. The board unanimously authorized the spending plan Tuesday.

Obstacles remain, not least the seemingly endless river of people falling into homelessness each year. In January, volunteers with the county's homeless count tallied 58,000 people sleeping on the streets, in cars, and in shelters—a 23 percent rise over the previous year. That rise came despite entities in L.A. County housing over 14,000 people last year, a record number.

Officials will also have to figure out how to site new housing for homeless and homeless shelters in communities that have been less-than-receptive to welcoming services into their neighborhoods. They'll also have to figure out how, in a competitive rental market, to recruit landlords to accept temporary and permanent rental subsidies to house homeless.

Read the full story here.

You can also find Rina Palta's story on the Golden Motel here

Guests:

Rina Palta, KPCC correspondent who covers the social safety net in Southern California; she was at the Board of Supervisors meeting yesterday

Becky Dennison, executive director of Venice Community Housing, a non-profit that aims to provide affordable housing, education and support services in Venice

Christian Wrede, member of Venice Vision, a neighborhood group that aims to create a safe and liveable community