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After the Alexandria shooting, a look at DC security culture




U.S. Capitol Police officers stand outside the west front of the U.S. Capitol on Capitol Hill, April 11, 2015 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Capitol Police officers stand outside the west front of the U.S. Capitol on Capitol Hill, April 11, 2015 in Washington, DC.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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The Congressional Baseball Game practice shooting yesterday is raising questions about the level of security for D.C. leaders.

House Majority Whip, Steve Scalise, in still in critical condition after he was shot in the hip during the incident. Scalise was the only person who had security detail among nine members of Congress at the practice. As reported by the Los Angeles Times, the two Capitol Security officers who were with the congressman are credited with saving his life. Alexandria police also arrived quickly on the scene, and the lone gunman was shot and later died of his injuries, according to a statement by President Trump.

Moving ahead, there are concerns about the level of security members of Congress should have. What goes into the decision to give detail to a leader in the Capitol? Will the current standards for security change after yesterday’s incident? If so, where would the resources come from?

Guest:

Cedric Leighton, founder and president of Cedric Leighton Associates, a risk and leadership management consultancy; he is also a retired colonel in the US Air Force and the former Director for Training of the National Security Agency; he is also a CNN military analyst