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SCOTUS case in Wisconsin could decide the constitutionality of partisan gerrymandering




Chief Justice John Roberts (2nd R) and Justice Neil Gorsuch (C) walk down the steps of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 15, 2017.
Chief Justice John Roberts (2nd R) and Justice Neil Gorsuch (C) walk down the steps of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, June 15, 2017.
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

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The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear a gerrymandering case which could set new rules on how state legislatures draw district lines.

As reported by Bloomberg news, the Wisconsin case would determine whether legislative maps showing too much partisanship should be deemed unconstitutional. This would be an unprecedented move for the Supreme Court, which has never denounced a legislative map based on partisanship.

The last time the issue was presented to the court was in 2004, when Justice Anthony Kennedy gave the deciding vote to keep Pennsylvania congressional districts in place. Kennedy said the challengers lacked “a workable standard” to prove there was an overreach in partisanship. The court will hear arguments in October.

Libby Denkmann speaks to Bloomberg News’ Greg Stohr for a breakdown of what the Wisconsin case could mean for the rest of the country.

Guest host Libby Denkmann in for Larry Mantle

Guest:

Greg Stohr, Supreme Court reporter for Bloomberg News; he has been following the story; he tweets @GregStohr