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How will Lyft Shuttle change public transit?




An Amp sits on the dashboard of a Lyft driver's car on January 31, 2017 in San Francisco, California.
An Amp sits on the dashboard of a Lyft driver's car on January 31, 2017 in San Francisco, California.
Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Lyft

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The latest endeavor from ridesharing company, Lyft, has a familiar ring to it.

Lyft Shuttle, revealed last week, was met with mixed reviews, and not just because it’s been described as a bus with a cooler name. As reported by the Los Angeles Times, critics say the shuttle will compete with public transit, giving commuters with the most money more exclusive options. And that means less demand to improve city transportation, and another way to separate the haves from the have-nots.

But supporters of the shuttle argue just the opposite: that giving the public a much needed alternative is simply responding to market needs. It also means incentivization for public transit to step up its game. In any case, Lyft Shuttle has put a big challenge on the longstanding transit monopoly.

Would you use Lyft shuttle? Do you think this will help improve public transit or will it stifle any advancement in city bus developments?

Guest host Libby Denkmann in for Larry Mantle

Guests:

Ed Krayewski, associate editor at Reason.com; he wrote the article “Lyft Shuttle Doesn't Reinvent the City Bus, But It May Break the Mass Transit Monopoly;” he tweets @edkrayewski 

Henry Grabar, staff writer for Slate; he writes about cities and transit; he tweets @HenryGrabar