Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

3 CNN reporters resign after retracted Russia-connections story




General view of the CNN Journalist Award 2013  at the Künstlerhaus at Lenbachplatz on April 4, 2013 in Munich, Germany.
General view of the CNN Journalist Award 2013 at the Künstlerhaus at Lenbachplatz on April 4, 2013 in Munich, Germany.
Dominik Bindl/Getty Images

Listen to story

19:09
Download this story 9.0MB

More fuel on the fake news fire.

This week, three CNN reporters resigned after a Russian-connections piece was retracted for “not meeting editorial standards”.

President Trump turned to Twitter yesterday to disparage CNN’s “phony stories” and throw shade at other outlets like the New York Times and Washington Post. Later in the day, a Sentinel reporter and deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders had a tense exchange about the role and responsibility of the media. Now, many news outlets (especially the big ones) have review processes before publishing investigative stories that include editors, fact-checkers and even lawyers – but they’re not always followed to the letter.

Even when all the i’s are dotted and the t’s crossed, mistakes still happen – especially when you add deadline pressure and a lightening-fast news cycle to the mix. But with the increasingly strained relationship between the press and the Trump Administration, what can journalists do to avoid further fanning the flames of media distrust across the country?

Guest host Libby Denkmann in for Larry Mantle

Guests:

Jane Kirtley, professor of media ethics and law at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota

Thomas Peele, investigative reporter for the Bay Area News Group; 2017 Pulitzer Prize winner; lecturer at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism; he tweets @thomas_peele