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Talking cybersecurity with the CEO of the company whose researcher shut down WannaCry




A laptop displays a message after being infected by a ransomware as part of a worldwide cyberattack on June 27, 2017.
A laptop displays a message after being infected by a ransomware as part of a worldwide cyberattack on June 27, 2017.
ROB ENGELAAR/AFP/Getty Images

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Last week, cyber virus Petya spread from Ukraine to Europe and parts of the U.S., as well as Asia and South America, taking down thousands of computers and disrupting ports from Long Beach to Australia.

NATO said the attack was likely state-backed, meaning it could be seen as an act of war, which would trigger Article 5, the principle of common defense.

This ransomware exploited the same security flaw as the WannaCry attack in May, which locked up computers in British hospitals, before a 22-year old computer security researcher found a kill switch in the code.

That researcher is part of Kryptos Logic, a small cybersecurity company based here in Los Angeles, and co-founded by Salim Neino. For Neino, these attacks didn’t come as a surprise. He believes they’re a bellwether and he’s urging lawmakers to prepare themselves. After the WannaCry attack, he testified before Congress and proposed a “Richter scale” to prioritize cyber threats and help companies create the necessary structures to ward off future attacks.  

Guest host Libby Denkmann sits down with Neino to discuss the future of cyber security. What have we learned from these recent ransomware attacks? And what can we do to protect ourselves in the future?

Guest:

Salim Neino, CEO  and co-founder of Kryptos Logic, a cybersecurity company based in Los Angeles; one of their researchers found the kill switch for the WannaCry ransomware attack in May