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Residents speak out about the controversial Playa del Rey ‘road diet’




Heavy traffic clogs the 101 Freeway as people leave work for the Labor Day holiday in Los Angeles on August 29, 2014.
Heavy traffic clogs the 101 Freeway as people leave work for the Labor Day holiday in Los Angeles on August 29, 2014.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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“Road diets” are heated subject in Southern California, a place where fighting traffic is a way of life.

In recent months, the conversation about fewer lanes to promote a safer roadway in Playa del Rey has ignited another debate between residents and city officials. The “Safe Streets for Playa del Rey Initiative,” spearheaded by City Councilmember Mike Bonin, was designed to curb speeding and crashes along Vista del Mar, a major road that’s been the scene of high-profile collisions which took pedestrian lives. But Vista del Mar is also slowing traffic down considerably, and residents are saying this is hurting tourism and property values.

Last month, because of opposition to these lane closures on the street, the city announced it would reinstate the original four lanes--two in each direction along the road. So what does that mean for road safety?

Guests:

John Russo, leading the Playa Del Rey branch of Keep L.A. Moving, a resident volunteer group to raise awareness and promote alternatives to L.A. County “road diet” plans

Kathryn Clarke, resident of Playa Del Rey involved in Safe Streets For Playa del Rey, a resident volunteer group initiative for safer streets in Playa del Rey