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Checking in on the Venezuela political crisis




Anti-government activists stand near a barricade burning in flames in Venezuela's third city, Valencia, on August 6, 2017, a day after a new assembly with supreme powers and loyal to President Nicolas Maduro started functioning in the country.
Anti-government activists stand near a barricade burning in flames in Venezuela's third city, Valencia, on August 6, 2017, a day after a new assembly with supreme powers and loyal to President Nicolas Maduro started functioning in the country.
RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

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Unrest in Venezuela continues more than a week after the establishment of a new constitutional assembly to rewrite the country’s constitution.

The controversial new assembly, which was created in a nationwide vote that critics slammed as illegitimate, has powers above all other branches of government. Over the weekend, the assembly removed the country’s chief prosecutor -- an outspoken critic of President Nicolas Maduro, fulfilling one of its promise to weed out opposition against President Nicolas Maduro.

A strike against a group of anti-government fighters at a military base in Venezuela also took place over the weekend. About 20 people broke into the based in the city of Valencia on Sunday morning, with an intent to start a military uprising, according to President Maduro.

Guests:

Daniel Pardo, BBC correspondent in Caracas, Venezuela who’s been following the story; he tweets @pardodaniel

Jennifer McCoy, a professor of Political Science at Georgia State University, where one of her areas of focus is Latin American politics; she is also co-author of the book,  “International Mediation in Venezuela” (United States Institute of Peace, 2011)