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The environmental and economic trade-offs of Trump’s infrastructure executive order




US President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower, August 15, 2017 in New York City. He fielded questions from reporters about his comments on the events in Charlottesville, Virginia and white supremacists.
US President Donald Trump delivers remarks following a meeting on infrastructure at Trump Tower, August 15, 2017 in New York City. He fielded questions from reporters about his comments on the events in Charlottesville, Virginia and white supremacists.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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President Trump last week announced the signing of an executive order to streamline permitting regulations and create manufacturing jobs.

While it may not have been the primary focus of the news conference following Charlottesville, Trump said he would pass a $1 trillion package to rebuild U.S. infrastructure. As reported by the New York Times, this would include ramping up road, bridge and pipeline construction. The president also said he was not worried about winning support for the plan. It would also roll back standards set by the Obama Administration requiring the federal government to consider climate change and sea-level rise during infrastructure building.

But Trump tried to reassure the public that though this process would streamline projects, it would also take environmental safeguards seriously. Republicans have expressed mixed feelings on whether the plan will safeguard against future flooding. What do you think of Trump’s executive order? Will it make economic sense in the long-run? And will rolling back Obama’s flood risk management standard help or hurt future infrastructure developments?

Guests:

Aaron M. Renn, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute where his research focuses on urban policy, economic development and infrastructure

Alice Hill, research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University; she was special assistant to President Obama as part of the National Security Council (2013 to 2016) and led the development of national policy regarding climate change