Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Traffic trade-offs: How LA negotiates commute time with the increasing cost of housing




Passengers board Metrolink subway trains during rush hour on June 3, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
Passengers board Metrolink subway trains during rush hour on June 3, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

Listen to story

29:07
Download this story 13.0MB

A recent New York Times piece by Conor Dougherty follows the commute of a middle-class woman who wakes up at 2:15am in her affordable Stockton home to take two trains and a bus to her job in San Francisco.

This example of a so-called “super commuter” is a familiar story to many in Los Angeles. With housing prices rising, Angelenos have to increasingly make trade-offs between finding an affordable living situation, often on the edges of L.A., and increased commute times to their jobs.

According to conventional wisdom, the happiness gained from a shorter commute is worth having a smaller place. But for many in L.A., financial reality necessitates both a long commute and a small home, just to make ends meet.

We want to hear about how you handle these trade-offs. What roles do commute time and housing cost play in your decisions regarding where you live? How many hours a day do you spend in your car? What financial and emotional concessions have you made in order to afford housing in L.A.?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Conor Dougherty, San-Francisco based economics reporter at The New York Times who focuses on the West coast economy; his recent article for the New York Times is “A 2:15 Alarm, 2 Trains and a Bus Get Her to Work by 7 a.m.