Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

What does Fido want? This neuroscientist puts animals in an MRI scanner to find out




Pug dogs and their owners arrive at PugFest Manchester, a festival celebrating pugs and pug cross dogs, held at MediaCityUK in Salford, Greater Manchester, northern England on July 16, 2017.
Pug dogs and their owners arrive at PugFest Manchester, a festival celebrating pugs and pug cross dogs, held at MediaCityUK in Salford, Greater Manchester, northern England on July 16, 2017.
OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

19:06
Download this story 9MB

Have you ever wondered how your dog feels about you? Does your dog love you for the food you provide, or do you both share an emotional connection?

These questions fascinated Gregory Berns, a neuroscientist at Emory University, after his beloved pug “Newton” died. And after five years of research, Berns and his team have some answers. In his new book, “What It’s Like to Be a Dog,” Berns takes a deep dive into the brains of dogs – along with many other animals – to provide insight and raise awareness of the mental lives of these animals.

Guest:

Gregory Berns, a professor of neuroeconomics at Emory University, where he also directs the Center for Neuropolicy and Facility for Education and Research in Neuroscience; author of “What It’s Like to Be a Dog: And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience” (Basic Books, 2017); he tweets @gberns