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In light of Harvey Weinstein’s firing, how could Hollywood’s exploitative culture change?




Harvey Weinstein attends the 'Lion' premiere and opening ceremony of the 12th Zurich Film Festival at Kino Corso on September 22, 2016.
Harvey Weinstein attends the 'Lion' premiere and opening ceremony of the 12th Zurich Film Festival at Kino Corso on September 22, 2016.
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

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Harvey Weinstein was officially fired from his company as of Sunday after a New York Times investigative story broke about allegations of sexual harassment.

Though his behavior has been described as Hollywood’s worst kept secret, it doesn't take much digging to divulge allegations of similar behavior by his peers in the industry. There was a 2014 sex abuse case against “X-Men” director Bryan Singer, and the term “casting couch” is synonymous with the culture between actors hungry for a role, and directors and producers having the power to open that door. While Weinstein is the big story now, we have yet to see if the repercussions for him will change the industry, and sexual harassment is only one way those at the top exercise power.

How do you think the entertainment industry could change exploitative behavior?

Guest:

Peter Bart, editor-at-large at Deadline Hollywood; he was editor-in-chief of Variety for 20 years (1989-2009)